CULTURAL HISTORY PART 3

Cultural History Pt. 3 Cultural erosion and revival After removal from Kansas, much of the tribe’s traditional ways and culture diminished in a short time. The government mandated tribal children to go to school, yet they were not allowed to speak their tribal...

CULTURAL HISTORY PART 2

Cultural History Pt. 2 Post-contact By the mid-18th century, the “Wind People” — as they were known to white traders and explorers — were in possession of most of present-day northern and eastern Kansas. Demographers have estimated that, as a consequence of the white...

CULTURAL HISTORY PART 1

CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE KAW/KANZA General information Formerly known as the Kanza (or Kansa) people, the Kaws are a federally recognized Indian tribe officially known as the Kaw Nation. Presently, there are 3,723 enrolled members who, under a legal agreement with the...

KANZA TIMELINE

Up to 1499 Pre-15th century When an Indian group became too large, it separated to better serve its population. The Dhegiha people are Siouan (not Sioux; the Dhegiha people belong to a larger group to which the Sioux also belong). The word Dhegiha refers to the...

HISTORICAL EVENTS

Since Removal from Kansas in 1873 Passage of the Curtis Act in 1898 (named after Charles Curtis – United States Vice President under Hoover and a Kaw tribal member) put into law several far-reaching and particularly damaging clauses. These included (a) more authority...

HISTORY OF KAW NATION

The Kanza people, also called the Kaw or Kansa people, are a federally recognized Native American tribe officially known as the Kaw Nation and dually headquartered in Kaw City and Newkirk, Oklahoma. The tribe currently consists of 3,376 enrolled members living as near...